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December 21

Nathan Bedford Forrest moves to Union City, capturing Union forces at Rutherford Station and Kenton Station and destroying railroads.

Skirmish on Benjamin Smith’s Plantation on Wilson Creek Pike (4th MI Cav and 4th KY Cav, U.S.); 7 CS killed and 10 captured.

 

Forrest crosses Tennessee River at Clifton, beginning raids into West Tennessee.

 

Hoofbeats in the Heartland: Civil War Cavalry in Tennessee is a traveling exhibit created by the museum to explore the development and impact of mounted warfare in Tennessee during the Civil War.

Funded in part by a grant from the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area, the traveling exhibition opened at Travellers Rest Historic House Museum in June of 2007 and continues to travel across Tennessee through the early part of 2010.

Drawing upon artifacts, photographs, drawings, and art from the collection of the Museum, the exhibition explores seven thematic areas: (1) Leaders (commanders such as Nathan Bedford Forrest, John Hunt Morgan, Samuel Carter, and John Wilder), (2) Troopers, (3) Horses and Mules, (4) Occupation and the home front, (5) Spies, Scouts, Partisans and Guerillas, (6) Battles in Tennessee, and (7) the Legacy. Each section includes photos, graphics, and artifacts explaining the role of mounted warfare during the Civil War era.

Due to mounted warfare, the home front often became the battle field as mounted soldiers skirmished on the streets of Memphis, Murfreesboro, Greeneville, and hundreds of towns and communities across the state. Indeed, every county of the state felt the impact of Union and Confederate cavalry thundering across the state as part of a raiding party, occupation force, or guerilla band. Each community had its unique experience with Civil War cavalry forces and the State Museum has encouraged each venue hosting the exhibition to develop a local history component to compliment the traveling exhibition.

For more information contact Myers Brown, Curator of Extension Services, at 615-741-2692 or by email at Myers.Brown@state.tn.us

2011 schedule

January – MarchMcMinn Living Heritage Museum, Athens

May – JulyKenosha, Wisconsin Civil War Museum (tentative)

August – October | West TN Welcome Center, Brownsville

Future dates are subject to change. Contact the specific institution for more precise information.

November – DecemberCarnton Plantation, Franklin, TN

 

1862

Capture of Island No. 10 by U.S.S. Carondelet after a two-week U.S. Naval bombardment; skirmish at Lawrenceburg; another near Pittsburg Landing, or Shiloh.

1863

Skirmishes at Woodbury, on Lewisburg Pike, and on Noconah Creek near Memphis. Reports from Florence, Alabama, say that the Confederates are building bridges and floats for crossing the Tennessee River in order to facilitate troop movements through that area.

1862

Skirmish near Monterey.

1863

Skirmish on Smith’s Ford or Snow Hill; skirmish at Liberty.

1864

U.S. advance against the Confederates is turned back near Memphis.

Skirmishes near Raleigh.

Skirmishes at Cypress Swamp.

1865

Union troops occupy Richmond. President Lincoln himself is said to be in the city, but his decision to go there is criticized by many news editors who feel he is putting himself in harm’s way:

“He has no right to put [his life] at the mercy of any lingering desperado in Richmond, or of any stray bullet in the field, unless some special service can be rendered by his personal presence.” [NYT] Gen. Stoneman’s forces capture the town of Boone, North Carolina.

Skirmishes at Mount Pleasant.

1862

A.S. Johnston reassembles Confederate Western forces at Corinth, MS. Grant takes command of the Union army at Pittsburg Landing, TN, in preparation for an assault on Corinth.

1863

Affair at Moscow; action near Belmont.

> Letter from 78th PA soldier at Murfreesboro

1864

Confederate cavalry under General Chalmers defeats U.S. forces at Bolivar. Forrest is said to be moving on Columbus, Kentucky.

Hoofbeats in the Heartland: Civil War Cavalry in Tennessee is a traveling exhibit created by the museum to explore the development and impact of mounted warfare in Tennessee during the Civil War.

Funded in part by a grant from the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area, the traveling exhibition opened at Travellers Rest Historic House Museum in June of 2007 and continues to travel across Tennessee through the early part of 2010.

Drawing upon artifacts, photographs, drawings, and art from the collection of the Museum, the exhibition explores seven thematic areas: (1) Leaders (commanders such as Nathan Bedford Forrest, John Hunt Morgan, Samuel Carter, and John Wilder), (2) Troopers, (3) Horses and Mules, (4) Occupation and the home front, (5) Spies, Scouts, Partisans and Guerillas, (6) Battles in Tennessee, and (7) the Legacy. Each section includes photos, graphics, and artifacts explaining the role of mounted warfare during the Civil War era.

Due to mounted warfare, the home front often became the battle field as mounted soldiers skirmished on the streets of Memphis, Murfreesboro, Greeneville, and hundreds of towns and communities across the state. Indeed, every county of the state felt the impact of Union and Confederate cavalry thundering across the state as part of a raiding party, occupation force, or guerilla band. Each community had its unique experience with Civil War cavalry forces and the State Museum has encouraged each venue hosting the exhibition to develop a local history component to compliment the traveling exhibition.

For more information contact Myers Brown, Curator of Extension Services, at 615-741-2692 or by email at Myers.Brown@state.tn.us

2011 schedule

January – March | McMinn Living Heritage Museum, Athens

May – JulyKenosha, Wisconsin Civil War Museum (tentative)

August – October | West TN Welcome Center, Brownsville

Future dates are subject to change. Contact the specific institution for more precise information.

November – December | Carnton Plantation, Franklin, TN

1862

U.S. Grant declares martial law in West Tennessee.

1863

Skirmish on Manchester Pike.

1864

Skirmishes on Calfkiller Creek and at Powell’s Bridge.

1865

A public referendum ratifies an amendment to the State Constitution abolishing slavery in Tennessee.

[Note that the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution will not be enacted until December 6, almost a year later.]

October 2014
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