You are currently browsing the monthly archive for April 2011.

1861

The Tennessee State Legislature has convened in secret session. Rumors say they have adopted a secession ordinance, which they will announce after an attack on Washington that is expected to take place on May 4.

1863

Gen. Streight’s force is routed at the Battle of Day’s Gap; Forrest takes Streight prisoner and sends him to Libby Prison. Streight will eventually escape by tunneling out from his barracks and will return to his own lines. Confederate deserters who come across to the Union lines near Murfreesboro speak of fighting on limited food rations – although they have sufficient flour and meal, they get only a quarter ration of bacon.

> Soldier’s sister learns of her brother’s death at Stones River, 18th OVI soldier

1862

Raid on Mobile and Ohio Railroad near Bethel Station; skirmish at Cumberland Gap.

1864

Sherman takes command of the army in Chattanooga and prepares for a campaign into Georgia.

April

Abraham Jobe writes in his memoirs: “I must hasten on to give a very short account of a few of the many things which took place…during the War of Rebellion. This was popularly called a Civil War, but I think it was a Secessional War…. I espoused the cause of the Union very early, when the war clouds first began to rise. Although born and reared in the South, I could see nothing but disaster [in the campaign for secession].”

Few love letters can compare with this gem sent by A.R.V., a Tennessee soldier in Pensacola as he contemplates returning home to his beloved: “Dear sweet Mollie Oh my love of loves clarified and oil of citron, white loaf sugar of my hopes. And molasses of my expectation you have been absent from me three years The sun is dark at midday the moon and stars are black when you are absent. Thy step is the muse of the spheres, and the wind of thy gown when you pass by as a Zephyr from the garden of Paradise in the spring time of earthly flowers! I kissed you when last we met and my whole frame thrilled with sweetness! One of your “curls” touched me on the nose and that organ was transmuted to loaf sugar. Oh spices, garden of delight! Send me a lock of your hair send me anything your blessed fingers have touched. And I will go raving mad with exstasy [sic]. One look from thy bright eyes would transmute me _____ with the third heaven. Your words are molten pearl dropping from your mouth. My heart blazes at the thought of your being my bride wilt thou consent? __ sincere lover A.R.V.”

1862

Skirmish at Pea Ridge.

> 4th KY Cav (US) soldier writes April 27th, 1862, from Bedford County, TN

1863

Skirmish on Carter Creek Pike, eight miles south of Franklin. A rumor circulates that Gen. Bragg has been shot and killed by Gen. Breckinridge. As attractive an idea as that might seem to Breckinridge, the rumor is soon proved to be without merit.

1864

Skirmish in Berry County.

1865

Sally Wendel Fentress comments in her journal on the Lincoln assassination: “Saw a paper this evening continuing a letter from John Wilkes Booth in which he intimated his intention of doing some desperate act in revenge for the tyranny practiced upon the people of the South. His name should be written on the highest pinnacle of fame for that one deed. He has sacrificed more than any of his contemporaries, sacrificed his profession which brought him twenty thousand a year, home, friends, family, all for ridding the world of the most consummate villain under the sun.”

1862

Skirmish at Atkins’ Mill.

1863

Affair near College Grove; skirmish at Duck River Island or Little Rock Landing.

1865

Confederate Gen. Joe Johnston meets with General William T. Sherman in North Carolina to negotiate the surrender of the Army of Tennessee and all remaining Confederate forces still active in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida – it is the largest surrender of the war (89,270 soldiers). [Interesting note: Sherman provides Johnston’s hungry troops with ten days’ rations, earning Johnston’s astonished gratitude and making the two men friends for life. When Sherman dies in 1891, Johnston will be a pallbearer.] Although CSA President Jefferson Davis is firmly set against surrender, and many com- manders (including Forrest in Alabama and Kirby-Smith in Texas) still know nothing of either surrender, the loss of both Lee’s and Johnston’s armies – the largest remaining forces – essentially means that the Civil War has ended.

1861

“I have joined the Nashville Guards commanded by Major Heiman, a gallant officer who has seen service in the wilds of Mexico.” [William L. B. Lawrence diary – Note: Adolphus Heiman, a prominent Nashville architect, designed St. Mary’s Catholic Church and the Belmont Mansion, the Giles County Court- house, and many other buildings and monuments. A Colonel in the 10th TN Regiment, he was taken prisoner in 1862 and died later that year.]

1865

Senator Peart submits a petition to the State Senate “from the colored men of East Tennessee,” asking for equal rights and protection under the law: “Without our political rights, our condition is very little better than it was before.” [NYT]

1862

Skirmishes at Lick Creek and on Shelbyville Road.

1863

Skirmish on Shelbyville Pike.

1865

Lucy Virginia French’s journal shows how long it takes for news to make its way around the country—this is more than a week after Lincoln’s death, and, of course, Seward and Johnson were not killed: “A great tragedy has been enacted … in the assassination of Lincoln and Seward…. I was out in the front yard clipping some cedars when the Col. [her husband] came to the door … and he said very quietly, ‘Well, Lincoln is dead.’ I had not the smallest idea it was true…. The story [we read was] that Lincoln and Johnson had been at the theatre together—a man had rushed up and stabbed both—killing Lincoln and mortally wounding Johnson, and the assassin had himself been killed on the instant…. We are told that about 30 citizens of Nashville were arrested because they implicated Andy [Johnson] in the assassination of ‘Honest Abe.’”

1861

The Richmond Dispatch reports on the rude treatment of Andrew Johnson by a large crowd in Lynchburg, Virginia, as he passed through on his way from Washington to Tennessee – “A large crowd assembled and groaned him, and offered every indignity he deserved, including pulling his nose.” The conductor and others intervene, and Johnson is eventually able to continue on his way.

1863

Skirmish at Hartsville. Col. Wilder’s troops take McMinnville, capturing food and other supplies, a cotton factory, two mills, and 300 prisoners; and destroying the bridges.

1864

Skirmishes at Waterhouse’s Mill and on the Duck River.

1864

Skirmishes at Waterhouse’s Mill and on the Duck River.

Use the TN Civil War GIS Map with this site.


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