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Forrest fights at Parker’s Crossroads/Red Mound trying to break through a Federal line after successful raids on Grant’s supply lines and communications. As he begins to drive the Union troops back, he is attacked from behind by Gen. Jeremiah Sullivan. Surrounded, Forrest fights his way out and escapes, but loses nearly 300 men.

Battle of Murfreesboro (Stones River) begins. Bragg’s army pushes Federals back to the Nashville Turnpike. Skirmish at Overall’s Creek.

“This has been a most eventful day. At daylight this morning very heavy cannonading was heard in the direction of Murfreesboro…. About 1 P.M. it was less frequent and seemed fainter—could it be that our [gallant] fellows were driving the Vandal before them?… Darlin’ [her pet name for her husband John] went into town [McMinnville] and came home about 11 o’clock with glorious news…. [Our troops] had whipped the enemy—loss heavy on both sides…. I could scarcely keep from crying for joy when Darlin’ told me the news…. I could not sleep for thinking of the poor fellows who were lying on the battlefield— some cold in death —others shivering with cold and writhing in pain…. [But] who was there with a warm glance to cheer their last agonizing hours?… The surgeons are busy tonight—the little city of Murfreesboro is full of the wounded. God help them!” [Lucy Virginia French, journal]

 

Rosecrans moves toward Murfreesboro; C.S. General Joseph Wheeler makes a raid against Rosecrans at Nolensville, going completely around the Federal Army; skirmishes at Jefferson and Rock Spring; capture of Union, Tennessee; destruction of Watauga Bridge.

CSA captures 600 U.S. troops, 450-500 wagons, hundreds of mules near LaVergne.

 

December 29

Nathan Bedford Forrest arrives at Parker’s Crossroads and sets up camp; Military Governor Andrew Johnson shuts down Nashville newspapers; U.S. Brigadier General Samuel Carter raids East Tennessee, destroying railroad bridges at Zollicoffer and Carter’s Depot; skirmishes at Lizzards and Wilkinson’s Cross-Roads.

December 29-30

Skirmishes at and near Murfreesboro.

 

Skirmishes at Stewart’s Creek Bridge on Murfreesboro Pike, and at Triune (65 U.S. killed); Forrest moves on McKenzie, learns of Federal pursuit.

 

1862

June 3-5

Confederates evacuate Fort Pillow, which is occupied by Union forces.

1863

Skirmish on the Manchester Pike near Murfreesboro.

1862

March 21-23

U.S. Forces begin reconnaissance against Cumberland Gap; skirmish there.

1863

Skirmish near Murfreesboro.

Parson Brownlow writes a letter to the Philadelphia Press, saying:

“We hope, in Tennessee, to have the rebel forces driven down into the Cotton States by late in the Spring or early in the Summer, so as to enable us to elect members of the Legislature and a Governor, all of loyal men. Then we shall redistrict the State and elect loyal Congressmen and Senators, so as to have them in Washington next Winter to back up the Administration and the army, and oppose the mad schemes of the Copperheads. We will also elect Judges, organize our Courts, and again put the machinery of civil government in motion.”

1864

Supporters of Gov. Andrew Johnson predict that the Republican Convention will nominate him as Vice-President on the ticket with Lincoln. [NYT]

1863

Skirmishes near Covington.

Skirmishes near Murfreesboro and Moscow.

Skirmish at Rutherford Creek.

Scouting party to Lafayette and skirmish there.

1863

Skirmish near Franklin.

Coverage of action in Spring Hill, Tenn., in the March 7th, 1863 – New York Evening Post

1864

Skirmish near Murfreesboro.

> Letter from 111th Ohio soldier writes from New Market, TN

1865

On a rainy morning, the city streets almost impassable with mud, Abraham Lincoln is inaugurated for a second term, with Tennessean Andrew Johnson as Vice President. Lincoln pledges “malice toward none and charity for all.”

Three days of heavy rains cause the Cumberland River to flood – the lower part of Nashville is “completely submerged,” and several bridges have been washed away. “It is believed the flood will be the greatest ever known.” [NYT]

1861

Jefferson Davis is inaugurated President of the Southern Confederacy.

> Read Davis’s Inauguration speech.

Harper's Weekly -- INAUGURATION OF PRESIDENT JEFFERSON DAVIS OF THE SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY, AT MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA, FEBRUARY 18, 1861.

1863

17-20

Expedition from Murfreesboro to Liberty.

18

Skirmish at Moscow.

A report from Nashville says the “Cumberland River is cleared of the rebels between Clarksville and Nashville. The river is much swollen, and is rising. The cotton lands are overflown.” [New York Times]

1864

Skirmishes at Mifflin, Maryville, and Sevierville.

1863

17th – 20th

Expedition from Murfreesboro to Liberty.

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