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Skirmish at Bradyville – Union forces under Gen. Stanley defeat a portion of John Morgan’s division, taking 70 prisoners, including 8 officers, their camp equipage, tents, 300 new saddles, 70 horses, and Basil Duke’s regimental papers.

A report from Nashville mentions that 26 buildings are used throughout the city as hospitals for sick and wounded soldiers.

> Letter, 36th Illinois soldier writes post-Murfreesboro action

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Skirmishes near Auburn, Cainsville, and Nolensville; skirmishing at Nashville and Clarksville. The Army of the Cumberland, now based in Murfreesboro, issues orders on how African Americans can be employed – as teamsters and laborers in Quartermasters’ departments; as cooks, nurses, and hospital attendants; as company cooks and officers’ servants.

Skirmishes near Auburn, Cainsville, and Nolensville; skirmishing at Nashville and Clarksville. The Army of the Cumberland, now based in Murfreesboro, issues orders on how African Americans can be employed – as teamsters and laborers in Quartermasters’ departments; as cooks, nurses, and hospital attendants; as company cooks and officers’ servants.

Skirmish at Rover. Skirmishes continue at Harper’s Ferry, and at bridges and railroads throughout the South. Troops continue to gather near Vicksburg.

Skirmish at Perkins Mill on Elk Fork.

“We had to be ‘Santa Claus’ ourselves this season for cakes, apples, a little candy, and some picture books were all that could be procured for the children. We had to tell them Santa Claus could not get thro’ the pickets—Jessie wanted to know why ‘the old fellow couldn’t go to his Quartermaster and get him a pass?’ They seemed to enjoy their Christmas quite as well as usual however, notwith- standing that Santa Claus was blockaded.”

 

Series of skirmishes at and near LaVergne.

 

Affair at Spring Creek; Forrest demonstrates in front of Jackson while detachments destroy railroads and bridges.

 

Nathan Bedford Forrest attacks a detachment of Union cavalry east of Lexington, taking prisoners, supplies, and artillery.

 

Nathan Bedford Forrest is ordered to raid West Tennessee to relieve pressure on C.S. forces in Mississippi.

 

Skirmish near Kimbrough’s Mill, Mill Creek.

Morgan attacks Federals at Hartsville, takes prisoners.

Work on Fort Negley, the largest Union fort west of Washington, D.C., is completed. The Fort is constructed over a three-month period by Union soldiers and hundreds of black workers – free and slave – who have been conscripted into service [http://www.bonps.org/neg.htm] in what is probably the first large-scale use of contraband labor in Tennessee during the war. Most are never paid; with little food, shelter, or appropriate clothing, many of these workers will die. The construction of Fort Negley becomes a model for future projects as Union troops, lacking labor, impress black men into service and work them mercilessly. [Hunt]

The bareness to which we are reduced [would] have seemed to me two years ago as incredible. We live on wheat, coffee, pork or goat meat, bread (both corn and wheat,) and we have a few potatoes and turnips, and one cow. . . . Butter is 1.00 per lb. and eggs 1.50 per dozen. No sugar, no molasses, a little dried fruit, and some in cans, but nothing to sweeten it with.” [Lucy Virginia French, journal]

 

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Use the TN Civil War GIS Map with this site.


@TN_150th

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